Postdoctoral fellow joins staff at Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center

By Julee Cobb

Postdoctoral fellow Amit Gautam, who previously worked in the sugar technology and water purification industries, is now a researcher for the Kanas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina.

Postdoctoral fellow Amit Gautam, who previously worked in the sugar technology and water purification industries, is now a researcher for the Kanas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center is growing its staff with the addition of a postdoctoral fellow. Amit Gautam, who has previously worked in the sugar technology and water purification industries, has joined the center as a researcher in the areas of bulk solids storage and handling.

Gautam most recently was a chemical engineer with Aqua ReUse, a manufacturer of industrial wastewater purification equipment and filtration media in Mission, Texas. He was responsible for the design, development, trouble-shooting and debottlenecking of converting a batch system to a continuous system, as well as creating separation and purification strategies that decreased total suspended solids and removed heavy metals from wastewater.

Gautam also was employed by the Audubon Sugar Institute, a part of Louisiana State University in St. Gabriel, Louisiana, as a postdoctoral researcher. His duties included testing the process of milling sugar cane and extracting sugar juice from the cane to find appropriate ways of reducing cost and waste. He also explored using fibrous residue from sugar to create cellulosic ethanol and butanol.

“We are excited to add Dr. Gautam to the K-State bulk solids team,” said Kurt Barnhart, associate dean of research and engagement on Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus. “He brings years of experience conducting research in this area and has already presented new ideas and opportunities to consider as we move the center forward and make it a recognized leader in bulk solids technology.”

At the center, Gautam is testing bulk solids — loose, dry commodities like minerals, chemicals, sugars, plastic resin, fillers, pellets or recycled plastics — to help clients understand the best way to store and handle their materials. He examines the physical characteristics of the bulk solids and how they behave under various conditions, such as humidity and hot and cold temperatures. He also puts them through both dense phase and dilute phase pneumatic conveying to determine which process works best as the bulk solids move through hoppers and storage equipment.

An expert in discrete element method, or DEM, Gautam additionally will create modeling of simulations. He plans to study the possible positive utilizations of dust explosions, teach short courses at the center and continue developing collaborations with other bulk solids institutes.

“Often times companies do no realize they are working with bulk solids, but these materials actually make up more than 80 percent of items transported around the world,” Gautam said. “I am proud to continue my research at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center because any advancements we discover will have an impact on a multitude of industries.”

A native of Mumbai, India, Gautam received a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Mumbai. His master’s degree is focused in bioprocess technology from the Institute of Chemical Technology, also in Mumbai, and he has a doctorate in chemical and biological engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City. Gautam’s ultimate goal is to become a professor.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center, in Salina, is a research, testing and educational facility dedicated to the science and understanding of bulk solids materials handling. The center is the only one of its kind in North America, housing six laboratories for university and industry-sponsored research; training, conference and lecture rooms; a material properties test lab; and a full-scale bulk solids test bay. The key tenant of the center is the university, while two local companies, Coperion K-Tron Salina and Vortex Valves, supplement the facility by serving as anchor occupants.

For more information on the facility’s research capabilities, contact John Lawrence, research director, at jlawren@k-state.edu, or Barnhart at 785-826-2972 or kurtb@k-state.edu.

International industry expert Richard Farnish to lead short course at Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center

By Julee Cobb

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina, which opened in May 2015, is dedicated to the science and understanding of bulk solids and offers a variety of professional development classes to help advance the industry.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina, which opened in May 2015, is dedicated to the science and understanding of bulk solids and offers a variety of professional development classes to help advance the industry.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center is offering a new short course focused on design, storage and flow with a renowned international industry expert serving as the lead lecturer.

Richard Farnish, a senior research fellow, consultant, engineer and professor with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich, in Chatham, North Kent, England, will help instruct a three-day course at the center titled, “Storage and Flow of Powders and Bulk Solids.” The course runs Nov. 8-10 and will educate participants on designing bins, hoppers, chutes and feeders; understanding flow properties and problems for powders and bulk solids; and implementing trouble-shooting procedures related to flow problems.

“It is an honor to host Mr. Farnish as our lead instructor during the November course offering because he brings with him expertise that spans many decades from around the world,” said John Lawrence, research director of the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center. “Richard excels specifically in problem-solving bulk solids handling from the shape and design of the hopper to aeration considerations and flow aids. Both his depth of knowledge and reputation will be a valuable asset to anyone who attends.”

Richard Farnish, a senior research fellow with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich in England, will share his expertise during a short course Nov. 8-10 at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina.

Richard Farnish, a senior research fellow with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich in England, will share his expertise during a short course Nov. 8-10 at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina.

Farnish, along with the other particle technology experts who are teaching, will utilize the facility’s full-scale test laboratory for group exercises so participants can apply the course material in a realistic setting. These practical experiments include flow property testing, material characterization testing, storage containers design and flow of bulk solids in different sized hoppers.

Professionals who are involved with the plastics, chemical, mineral, food, grain and feed or pharmaceutical industries are encouraged to attend. The course costs $1,500 per participant and is designed for both new employees who need an introduction to the bulk solids arena as well as those who are seeking to develop their knowledge and experience. Registration and additional course information can be found at bulk-solids.k-state.edu/profdev/flow.html.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center – opened in May 2015 – is a 13,000-square-foot space used to study the science and understanding of bulk solids materials handling within undergraduate education, professional development and industry research. The vast amenities and offerings of the facility make it the only one of its kind in North America.

For additional inquiries about the center and its capabilities, contact Lawrence at jlawren@k-state.edu or 785-829-1110.

Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center hosts Wolfson Centre senior researcher Richard Farnish for site visit and presentation

With an aim to continue advancing the education and research of bulk solids handling, the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center welcomed industry expert Richard Farnish to the facility last month for a site visit and special presentation.

Farnish, who is a senior research fellow, consultant, engineer and professor with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich, in Chatham, North Kent, England, spoke with employees of the innovation center as well as Kansas State University professors in the engineering technology field on May 9 about particulate handling. During his lecture, he provided insight into where and why challenges occur with the process and also offered solutions to preventing these obstacles, saving both time and money.

Richard Farnish, a senior research fellow with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich, shares his expertise in diagnosing and solving bulk solids handling problems during a presentation at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center May 9.

Richard Farnish, a senior research fellow with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich, shares his expertise in diagnosing and solving bulk solids handling problems during a presentation at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center May 9.

“Richard has more than 20 years of experience in the bulk solids industry, so to have him visit our facility and offer up his expertise is quite an honor,” said Kurt Barnhart, associate dean of research at Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus, also located in Salina, Kansas. “The key point of his message is that more bulk solids education is needed – companies should develop their knowledge of handling systems before purchasing one by performing research and an informed, thoughtful analysis, and this is a process our innovation center is aiming to help with.”

While at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center, Farnish also took a tour of the property and made recommendations on additional equipment that would assist with the efficiency and accuracy of research.

The 13,000-square-foot facility – celebrating its one-year anniversary in May – was created to promote bulk solids materials handling within undergraduate education, professional development and industry research. Two local companies, Coperion K-Tron Salina and Vortex Valves, serve as anchor occupants in the building. The vast amenities and offerings of the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center make it the only one of its kind in North America.

For information regarding upcoming short courses, or inquiries about the center and its capabilities, contact John Lawrence, the facility’s research director, at jlawren@k-state.edu or 785-829-1110.

Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center welcomes experts from DuPont, Dow Chemical as part of inaugural short course

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center hosted more than 30 students from 12 different states during its inaugural short course Jan. 26-29, which covered the fundamentals of bulk solids processing and handling.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center hosted more than 30 students from 12 different states during its inaugural short course Jan. 26-29, which covered the fundamentals of bulk solids processing and handling.

By Julee Cobb

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center is introducing new educational offerings for professional development and conducted its first short course Jan. 26-29, covering the fundamentals of bulk solids processing and handling.

With registration at capacity, the inaugural session hosted participants from 12 different states representing such companies as Nutrilite, Nestle, Styrolution, Green Dot and Kice Industries. The course was designed to give both new and existing employees within the particle technology field comprehensive knowledge pertaining to handling, processing, storage and flow behavior.

“Education on the science and safety of bulk solids is imperative because almost every industry has properties of particle technology,” said John Lawrence, the facility’s research director. “And after the excellent response we had to our first course, it’s evident that there is a strong demand among manufacturers to gain a better understanding of bulk solids. We are excited to be able to provide more of these learning opportunities in the near future.”

A variety of renowned experts in the field — such as Timothy Bell, an engineering fellow with DuPont; Karl Jacob, an engineering fellow from the Dow Chemical Co.; and Ben D’Alessio, director of dense phase systems at Coperion K-Tron — were brought in to lead classroom discussions and hands-on demonstrations in the center’s full-scale test laboratory. Along with an overview of pneumatic conveying, the three-and-a-half-day course also further examined challenges within the hopper. Participants were exposed to powder and solid flow problems and were shown how to prevent and mitigate a dust explosion. They also explored programmable logic controller, or PLC, technology.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center plans to offer this foundational course every six months, while courses focused on more specific topics will be given throughout the year. The center’s next class, March 8-10, will specialize in pneumatic conveying of powders and bulk solids. Registration information can be found online at bulk-solids.k-state.edu/profdev/.

The 13,000-square-foot facility – officially opened in May 2015 – was created to promote bulk solids materials handling within undergraduate education, professional development and industry research. Two local companies, Coperion K-Tron Salina and Vortex Valves, serve as anchor occupants in the building. The vast amenities and offerings of the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center make it the only one of its kind in North America.

For information regarding upcoming short courses, or inquiries about the center and its capabilities, contact Lawrence at jlawren@k-state.edu or 785-829-1110.

Research director joins Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center as its first hire

By Julee Cobb

Following an international search, John Lawrence has joined the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center as its first research director. Lawrence, a doctorate-level agricultural engineer who specializes in food processing, specifically grain storage management, is the facility’s first hire since opening this summer.

Agricultural engineer John Lawrence is the new Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center research director.

Agricultural engineer John Lawrence is the new Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center research director.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center, located in Salina, is a research, testing and educational facility dedicated to the science and understanding of bulk solids materials handling. The center is the only one of its kind in North America, housing six laboratories for university and industry-sponsored research; training, conference and lecture rooms; a material properties test lab; and a full-scale bulk solids test bay.

As a key researcher, Lawrence works to solve the movement challenges bulk solids have while passing through the hoppers, or containers, in which they are stored. Often times particles can become densified and stagnant in various spots in the hopper, preventing all the material from flowing smoothly. Lawrence’s research also will focus on finding and solving problems within particle disintegration and segregation in the pipeline during pneumatic conveying.

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Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center celebrates open house

By Sarah Hancock

The weather was wheat-harvest warm on June 24 as a new K-State research facility hosted an open house attended by representatives from more than 60 companies. Attendees came from as far away as Switzerland and as close as across the street to hear how the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina can help them better understand how to handle loose, dry commodities and powders, including the wheat locals were cutting in nearby fields.

Matt Burt, K-State graduate and general sales manager at Coperion K-Tron in Salina, an anchor tenant of the center, said he and his staff are excited about the facility.

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