International industry expert Richard Farnish to lead short course at Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center

By Julee Cobb

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina, which opened in May 2015, is dedicated to the science and understanding of bulk solids and offers a variety of professional development classes to help advance the industry.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina, which opened in May 2015, is dedicated to the science and understanding of bulk solids and offers a variety of professional development classes to help advance the industry.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center is offering a new short course focused on design, storage and flow with a renowned international industry expert serving as the lead lecturer.

Richard Farnish, a senior research fellow, consultant, engineer and professor with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich, in Chatham, North Kent, England, will help instruct a three-day course at the center titled, “Storage and Flow of Powders and Bulk Solids.” The course runs Nov. 8-10 and will educate participants on designing bins, hoppers, chutes and feeders; understanding flow properties and problems for powders and bulk solids; and implementing trouble-shooting procedures related to flow problems.

“It is an honor to host Mr. Farnish as our lead instructor during the November course offering because he brings with him expertise that spans many decades from around the world,” said John Lawrence, research director of the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center. “Richard excels specifically in problem-solving bulk solids handling from the shape and design of the hopper to aeration considerations and flow aids. Both his depth of knowledge and reputation will be a valuable asset to anyone who attends.”

Richard Farnish, a senior research fellow with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich in England, will share his expertise during a short course Nov. 8-10 at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina.

Richard Farnish, a senior research fellow with the Wolfson Centre at the University of Greenwich in England, will share his expertise during a short course Nov. 8-10 at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina.

Farnish, along with the other particle technology experts who are teaching, will utilize the facility’s full-scale test laboratory for group exercises so participants can apply the course material in a realistic setting. These practical experiments include flow property testing, material characterization testing, storage containers design and flow of bulk solids in different sized hoppers.

Professionals who are involved with the plastics, chemical, mineral, food, grain and feed or pharmaceutical industries are encouraged to attend. The course costs $1,500 per participant and is designed for both new employees who need an introduction to the bulk solids arena as well as those who are seeking to develop their knowledge and experience. Registration and additional course information can be found at bulk-solids.k-state.edu/profdev/flow.html.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center – opened in May 2015 – is a 13,000-square-foot space used to study the science and understanding of bulk solids materials handling within undergraduate education, professional development and industry research. The vast amenities and offerings of the facility make it the only one of its kind in North America.

For additional inquiries about the center and its capabilities, contact Lawrence at jlawren@k-state.edu or 785-829-1110.

Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus opens new facility dedicated to community outreach, professional development

By Julee Cobb

Kansas State Polytechnic officially opens the campus's new Outreach Center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Sept. 8. From left are members of the Salina Area Chamber of Commerce All-America Team; Joe Harrison, director of facilities for Kansas State Polytechnic; Danielle Brown, director of the campus's professional education and outreach department; Alysia Starkey, associate dean of undergraduate studies for Kansas State Polytechnic; and another member of the All-America Team.

Kansas State Polytechnic officially opens the campus’s new Outreach Center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Sept. 8. From left are members of the Salina Area Chamber of Commerce All-America Team; Joe Harrison, director of facilities for Kansas State Polytechnic; Danielle Brown, director of the campus’s professional education and outreach department; Alysia Starkey, associate dean of undergraduate studies for Kansas State Polytechnic; and another member of the All-America Team.

The professional education and outreach department on Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus is officially home.

The Outreach Center, a new facility dedicated to the department’s community and professional development services, opened its doors Sept. 8 following a ribbon-cutting ceremony on the north corridor of the Polytechnic Campus. Built more than 50 years ago and original to the Air Force base that came before the campus property, the building has been fully renovated to include a training classroom, testing center and multiple office spaces.

“The opening of the Outreach Center marks a proud moment in the history of Kansas State Polytechnic because it demonstrates the campus’s continuous advancement toward our strategic goals of growing in both educational offerings and infrastructure,” said Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic. “The center will provide professional education and outreach with the vital resources it needs to serve its clients and the community while acting as inspiration for the rebirth of the north section of campus.”

For years, professional education and outreach has been offering a multitude of diverse training programs, professional development resources, K-12 collaborations and civic engagement opportunities. From grade school children in summer aviation camps to Osher lifelong learning classes for people 50 and older, there are programs for a large spectrum of ages, and each offering has a broad audience reach – community members, students and industry professionals. Kansas State Polytechnic’s technology management bachelor’s degree is also offered online through the department.

“It has been the vision of professional education and outreach to provide the campus, community and our industry partners with an innovative, collaborative space where learning is accessible and inspired,” said Danielle Brown, director of the department. “The Outreach Center has exceeded our expectations and we are excited to utilize this valuable asset, especially the training classroom because it is an essential space for our programs and it holds a variety of necessary technology amenities.”

The Outreach Center was designed with multipurpose spaces, which can be adapted and easily reconfigured as programs and staff evolve over the years. Also available is office space for professional education and outreach, an additional tenant, a testing center for students and a training classroom. Significant technology upgrades were added to the classroom area, including enhanced lighting controls, high-definition cameras and microphones, flat-screen televisions, connection with any web-based meeting software and the capacity to video conference another class in a separate location.

Originally constructed in 1956 as part of Schilling Air Force Base, now home to the Polytechnic Campus, the Outreach Center has had a variety of uses over the years, including as a computer science building, student union and student activities center. Though the decision to tear it down when starting the renovation may have seemed like a logical one, Kansas State Polytechnic wanted to keep an environmental consciousness about the build.

“By repurposing this facility, Kansas State Polytechnic was able to enhance our ability to be resourceful stewards in both the fiscal and environmental realms,” said Joe Harrison, director of facilities for the campus. “By choosing to reuse in lieu of demolition, this allowed us to minimize the environmental impact by negating the need to disturb existing greenfield areas for utilities and foundations. This also enabled us to significantly reduce the amount of construction waste, which would typically have been generated and slated for a local landfill.”

The Outreach Center is in the north corridor of the campus, which is an area Kansas State Polytechnic plans on redeveloping, starting with the addition of K-State Research and Extension. Details about building renovations and a timeline are forthcoming.

For questions about the Outreach Center or to learn more about the program offerings of professional education and outreach, contact Brown at 785-826-2633 or profed@k-state.edu.

Kansas State Polytechnic’s Dean Verna Fitzsimmons receives national recognition with Inspiring Women in STEM Award

By Julee Cobb

Verna Fitzsimmons, the CEO and dean of Kansas State University's Polytechnic Campus, has been chosen by INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine as one of the recipients of its 2016 Inspiring Women in STEM Award.

Verna Fitzsimmons, the CEO and dean of Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus, has been chosen by INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine as one of the recipients of its 2016 Inspiring Women in STEM Award.

As the first woman to be CEO and dean of Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus, Verna Fitzsimmons is receiving national recognition for her continued support and leadership of women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM.

INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the largest and oldest diversity and inclusion publication in higher education, has named Fitzsimmons a recipient of its 2016 Inspiring Women in STEM Award. This accomplishment honors women who work to inspire and encourage a new generation of young women to consider careers in STEM through mentoring, teaching, research and successful programs and initiatives. Fitzsimmons will be featured, along with 65 other recipients, in the September 2016 issue of the magazine.

“I am truly honored to receive this recognition because part of my purpose as a female educator with an engineering background is instilling in young women the belief that there are no boundaries when it comes to their future,” said Fitzsimmons, who has been at the helm of Kansas State Polytechnic since 2012. “Growing up, I had amazing mentors who encouraged and exposed me to STEM fields and I believe it is my responsibility as well as my honor to do the same for the next generation.”

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Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center welcomes experts from DuPont, Dow Chemical as part of inaugural short course

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center hosted more than 30 students from 12 different states during its inaugural short course Jan. 26-29, which covered the fundamentals of bulk solids processing and handling.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center hosted more than 30 students from 12 different states during its inaugural short course Jan. 26-29, which covered the fundamentals of bulk solids processing and handling.

By Julee Cobb

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center is introducing new educational offerings for professional development and conducted its first short course Jan. 26-29, covering the fundamentals of bulk solids processing and handling.

With registration at capacity, the inaugural session hosted participants from 12 different states representing such companies as Nutrilite, Nestle, Styrolution, Green Dot and Kice Industries. The course was designed to give both new and existing employees within the particle technology field comprehensive knowledge pertaining to handling, processing, storage and flow behavior.

“Education on the science and safety of bulk solids is imperative because almost every industry has properties of particle technology,” said John Lawrence, the facility’s research director. “And after the excellent response we had to our first course, it’s evident that there is a strong demand among manufacturers to gain a better understanding of bulk solids. We are excited to be able to provide more of these learning opportunities in the near future.”

A variety of renowned experts in the field — such as Timothy Bell, an engineering fellow with DuPont; Karl Jacob, an engineering fellow from the Dow Chemical Co.; and Ben D’Alessio, director of dense phase systems at Coperion K-Tron — were brought in to lead classroom discussions and hands-on demonstrations in the center’s full-scale test laboratory. Along with an overview of pneumatic conveying, the three-and-a-half-day course also further examined challenges within the hopper. Participants were exposed to powder and solid flow problems and were shown how to prevent and mitigate a dust explosion. They also explored programmable logic controller, or PLC, technology.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center plans to offer this foundational course every six months, while courses focused on more specific topics will be given throughout the year. The center’s next class, March 8-10, will specialize in pneumatic conveying of powders and bulk solids. Registration information can be found online at bulk-solids.k-state.edu/profdev/.

The 13,000-square-foot facility – officially opened in May 2015 – was created to promote bulk solids materials handling within undergraduate education, professional development and industry research. Two local companies, Coperion K-Tron Salina and Vortex Valves, serve as anchor occupants in the building. The vast amenities and offerings of the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center make it the only one of its kind in North America.

For information regarding upcoming short courses, or inquiries about the center and its capabilities, contact Lawrence at jlawren@k-state.edu or 785-829-1110.

Kansas State Polytechnic’s director of professional education and outreach receives national ‘Rising Star’ award

After only two years as the director of Kansas State Polytechnic‘s professional education and outreach department, Danielle Brown is getting national recognition for her service to and impact on the industry.

Danielle Brown, Kansas State Polytechnic's professional education and outreach director, was named the 2015 Rising Star for the Association of Continuing Higher Education.

Danielle Brown, Kansas State Polytechnic’s professional education and outreach director, was named the 2015 Rising Star for the Association for Continuing Higher Education.

The Association for Continuing Higher Education has named Brown their Rising Star for 2015. Brown was selected for the award because of her contribution to the development of new credit, noncredit and certificate programs for the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus as well as community-based programs that pair the campus with Kansas industries.

Brown was presented as the Rising Star at the Association for Continuing Higher Education’s national conference in St. Louis on Nov. 10. She was nominated by campus leadership and K-State’s Global Campus.

“This award means a great deal to me,” said Brown, “however, the success of professional education and outreach has been a team effort, so to have myself and the work of my department and this campus recognized is rewarding on many levels.”

Brown has helped spearhead a variety of educational agreements including a recent partnership with Wichita Area Technical School to assist their students with combining an associate degree with two years of online classes through Kansas State Polytechnic to receive a bachelor’s degree in technology management. She also has led the development of a K-State professional pilot bachelor’s degree in the Kansas City area through partnerships with Johnson County Community College and Air Associates of Kansas. And her department continues to cultivate community events such as Candy Canes and Airplanes and Discover Programs.

“I believe in the principle that we never stop learning or growing professionally,” said Brown. “One of the best parts of my job is leveraging connections and partnerships to create programs and lifelong learning opportunities that advance others’ education and careers.”

Brown joined the Kansas State Polytechnic campus in 2008 as the academic services coordinator in student support services. In 2011, she became a career and academic advisor in the academic and career advising center before moving over to professional education and outreach. Brown holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from Fort Hays State University and a master’s degree in business administration from Kansas Wesleyan University.

Kansas State Polytechnic and Wichita Area Technical College partner on bachelor’s degree in technology management

By Julee Cobb

College students living in the Wichita area have a new opportunity to advance their education through a bachelor’s degree program to be offered by Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus and Wichita Area Technical College.

Both schools have developed and signed a new 2+2 agreement, which allows students attending Wichita Area Technical College to complete a Kansas State University bachelor’s degree in technology management while staying in the Wichita community and taking classes online. The two institutions were eager to collaborate on the project, which they believe enhances students’ education options and meets a need in the state of Kansas.

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K-State Salina’s Civic Luncheon Lecture to highlight community improvement, future of city planning

By Julee Cobb

The strategy behind how cities across the U.S. will develop in the next 20 years and the role citizens will play in those changes is the latest topic to be discussed at Kansas State University Salina’s Civic Luncheon Lecture.

Stephen Hardy, chief product officer for Mindmixer in Kansas City, Missouri, will lead this month's Civic Luncheon Lecture presentation.

Stephen Hardy, chief product officer for Mindmixer in Kansas City, Missouri, will lead this month’s Civic Luncheon Lecture presentation.

“Cities of Tomorrow” will be presented at noon Thursday, Oct. 8, at K-State Salina’s College Center conference room. Stephen Hardy, chief product officer for Mindmixer in Kansas City, Missouri, will lead the presentation on community improvement and progression as well as governance planning. Mindmixer is a company that connects more than 1 million people to more than 700 organizations working to enhance communities across the continent.

“As technology and the economy change, it’s important for communities to look ahead at how their geography, transportation and commerce may be affected,” said Greg Stephens, associate professor of arts, sciences and business at K-State Salina and creator of the lecture series. “We’re excited to be able to bring in Stephen to give his perspective on community development and we hope to inspire those who attend to go back into their towns and help make a difference.”

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Kansas State University Salina joins Girl Scouts of Kansas Heartland for Program on Demand initiative

By Julee Cobb

After collaborating with the Girls Scouts of Kansas Heartland for the past five years in a variety of capacities, Kansas State University Salina is elevating the partnership by joining the Girl Scouts’ Program on Demand initiative.

Exactly what the name suggests, K-State Salina will be a resource for troops at their request, creating learning experiences tailored to the individual troops’ interests and schedule. These specifically designed programs will have a focus in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, and will coincide with badge work, community service projects or extracurricular activities.

“We’re thrilled to be working with an organization as iconic as the Girl Scouts and we value the importance of educating, motivating and empowering these young women,” said Kirsten Zoller, K-State Salina’s event coordinator. “Whether it’s through our collegiate degrees, our youth Discover Programs or this new partnership, the campus wants to help young people change the world.”

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